Study shows homeownership positive for low-income neighborhoods

    
 

Thursday, Mar 29 2012 3:55PM

A study by the University of North Carolina's Center for Community Capital shows a direct link between homeownership in low-income neighborhoods and residents' perceptions of crime.

A study by the University of North Carolina's Center for Community Capital shows a direct link between homeownership in low-income neighborhoods and residents' perceptions of crime.

A study by the University of North Carolina's Center for Community Capital shows a direct link between homeownership in low-income neighborhoods and residents' perceptions of crime.

The Center's findings, which were based on answers from roughly 2,000 low-income homeowners and renters, indicate that low-income areas with higher homeownership rates influence residents' assumptions about crime in the area.

One aspect the study's authors noted was increased levels of homeownership in low-income communities helped provide social and economic advantages for the area.

"The housing downturn and foreclosure crisis have raised questions about the role of homeownership in stabilizing low-income communities," said Center Research Director Mark R. Lindblad, who co-authored the report. "Our findings demonstrate that, when coupled with sustainable mortgages, homeownership reduces residents’ perception of crime as a key problem for their community."

Housing counseling grants are one way to help improve homeownership levels in low-income areas, including those in rural communities. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development recently announced $42 million in housing counseling grants to help families maintain homeownership.

For further information, check out these sources: University of North Carolina, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

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